BA in Hospitality Management



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This degree is essential for all those wishing to follow a path in the hospitality and tourism industry. The hospitality industry and associated services is a huge and dynamic sector with excellent prospects and opportunities. The degree provides the students with all the necessary knowledge, leadership, analytical and communication skills and prepares them to engage successfully in this demanding sector of the economy. It provides the student with the necessary tools to add value to any organization operating in the hospitality industry. Upon completion students will be able to understand in depth the forces and the challenges that drive such a dynamic sector and will be able to interact effectively within any organisation in the industry.

This degree is ideal for people wishing to enhance their position within their organisations while at the same time it offers excellent prospects for future employment in the fields of food and beverage, hotels and resorts, restaurant management and marketing.

By enrolling on the BA Hospitality Management degree programme, our students have the option to transfer, in their fourth year, to the BA (Honours) Business Studies (Top-up) degree of the University of South Wales, and graduate with a UK degree. The duration of the  BA (Honours) Business Studies (Top-up) degree is approximately 1 – 2 years.

The USW top-up degree programme provides a broad-based business education, preparing graduates for employment in a range of organisations. It can also serve as preparation for professional and post-graduate study. During this one-year, ‘top-up’ programme, students examine core aspects of business, such as strategy and communication, while investigating specific business problems as real life scenarios.

For more information please visit https://southwales.unicaf.org/programmes/ba-hons-business- studiestop-up- degree/ or speak to  your student adviser

Delivery Mode: Online and through Supported Open Learning

Entry Requirements

  1. Regular admission to a Bachelor’s degree programme requires the High School Leaving Certificate or equivalent.
  2. Applicants with a Diploma or Advanced Diploma may be considered for entry.
  3. Applicants with a Diploma or Advanced Diploma in a relevant area may be considered for credit transfer.
  4. Applicants who do not meet the minimum academic requirements but who have at least 2 years relevant post secondary professional experience may be considered for entry
  5. English proficiency.
  6. Copy of passport or ID

Applicants that do not meet the minimum entry requirements may be considered for the ‘FOUNDATION PROGRAMME’.

In addition to a strong academic record, the student’s extra curricular involvement, leadership skills and other relevant background information are taken into account.

Section: Language Expression Modules

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• help students develop skills necessary to work within a business-orientated context
• facilitate students’ develop of business communication skills in the areas of business correspondence (i.e. letter format, open punctuation, notes, memoranda, emails, tone, writing and public speaking) and key business terminology and concepts.

Learning Outcomes:

1. write a variety of fully-blocked letters that use open punctuation and the four-point plan.
2. create a range of buy/sell documents with their corresponding cover letters
3. produce professional emails that use netiquette
4. write different kinds of letters of application and CVs, testimonials
5. create business memos, meeting documentation, itineraries, and a wide collection of publicity materials
6. confidently describe data
7. prepare and give a business presentation

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

1. Increase the students’ awareness and ability in different common styles of writing
2. Develop the students’ academic writing skills
3. Revise and utilise techniques of composing grammatically correct sentences
4. Provide students with deep knowledge of the writing process and the strategies to develop, organize, and review ideas in English paragraphs and essays
5. Cover problem areas in the use of grammar and mechanics Basic Writing is at Level B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Demonstrate an awareness of the writing process, sentence structure, punctuation and spelling.
2. Compose different types of effective outlines and understandable, coherent paragraphs that have a clearly stated topic sentence.
3. Compose well developed common essay genres with a clearly stated thesis statement.
4. Compose introductions, body paragraphs and conclusions for essays.
5. Recognize and correct fragments, comma splices, and run-on sentences.
6. Employ the most effective words for concise writing

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• To teach students how to produce academic papers (research papers & theses);
• To develop the style and vocabulary characteristic of academic writing;
• To develop academic reading and writing skills that allow students to use material more effectively in their own academic papers; At the end of the semester, students are expected to be close to functioning at C1 (Proficient User) level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Scan long and complex texts, summarize information and reconstruct arguments in a coherent presentation;
2. Produce organized and coherent essays with clear paragraphs and use of methods for introducing and concluding an essay;
3. Write well-supported essays using different patterns of development (illustration, cause and effect, process analysis, persuasion) taking into consideration purpose and audience.
4. Write proposals, critical analyses, summaries and literature reviews;
5. Demonstrate techniques to avoid plagiarism (paraphrasing, summarizing and quoting) and produce research papers with correct parenthetical and bibliographical citations using specific documentation styles such as MLA, APA, Harvard etc.);
6. Write accurately with a wide vocabulary and few errors in spelling or punctuation.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

1. Appropriate levels of oral and written communication in English
2. General knowledge of all grammatical structures
3. Basic and general knowledge of the paragraph
4. Intercultural competence
5. Ability to work autonomously/independently
6. Ability to work collaboratively
7. Ethical commitment Upon completion of the course students are at the end of B1 (Threshold level).

Learning Outcomes:

1. Exercise listening skills through dialogues, announcements, instructions and discussions.
2. Communicate using the full range of tenses in contexts both familiar and non-familiar
3. Exercise reading skills such as vocabulary in context, word structure, prefixes and suffixes, scanning, skimming, identifying main ideas etc
4. Demonstrate the use of the structure and purpose of the paragraph in writing
5. Apply practiced reading strategies and produce summary, narrative and descriptive writing at the paragraph level

Section: Computer Modules

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

· Introduce students to the digital world. Follow the developments in computer hardware and software from the initial steps of generation to modern and future time.
· Introduce the components of an information system, i.e., hardware, software, data, networks, facilities, personnel, services and partners.
· Closely examine information system’s hardware. Specifically consider the processing unit, input and output devices, and primary and secondary storage. Examine the         technology and analyze its characteristics.
· Examine information systems in organizations. Explore different types of software: applications, system software.
· Introduce information systems’ development. Consider the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC). Introduce computer programming languages and database concepts.
· Introduce data communications. Focus on local area networks and consider security issues.
· Explore the Internet, web resources and their use.
· Address information systems security, and issues relating to ethics, and crime in the computer world.

Learning Outcomes:

· Appreciate the role of information systems and technology in our digital world.
· Comprehend the developments occurring in the information technology era from its initiation to present time and the future trends.
· Name and describe the components of an information system. More specifically and concerning information system’s hardware the student should be able to describe and   analyze the characteristics of the processing unit, input and output devices, and primary and secondary storage.
· Based on the knowledge gained above the student should be able to suggest a certain computer configuration based on specified organization or personal needs.
· Understand data representation and work with different number systems.
· Describe an I. S. professional and his/her role and career opportunities in an organization.
· Differentiate between application and systems software and subtypes.
· Understand the requirements for developing an information system: process (e.g. SDLC), computer programming languages, and data storage.
· Demonstrate basic knowledge about data communications, the Internet and web resources.
· Understand how to secure information systems resources, focusing on both human and technological safeguards.
· Understand how information systems raise ethical concerns in society, and how they influence crime.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

· Students will study a variety of business models in the national and global context connecting individuals, businesses, governments and other organizations. They will be exposed to the concept of strategy at the corporate level, the business unit level and the operational level as well as the concept of value creation.
· Students will study the management of information systems services from the point of view of the CIO and to examine alternative strategies and tactics available to            management to achieve their goals.
· Students will study the e-business strategy framework with concentration on the impact of the Internet on the macro-environment, the industry structure
and the firm boundaries, the markets for e-business and the strategy options for value creation in market spaces.
· Students will gain insight into how IS enables core and supportive business processes as well as those that interface with suppliers and customers and how
they represents a key source of competitive advantage for firms.
· Students will get an understanding of existing and emerging information technologies, the functions of IS and their impact on the organizational operations.
· Students will use the steps of the e-business strategy formulation roadmap, link the individual steps of the roadmap to the different parts of the e-business
strategy formulation, and understand the main business issues involved in each stage of the roadmap.
· Students will apply the above concepts in the design and implementation of an e-business initiative. A content management system will be used for thispurpose.
Learning Outcomes:

1. Be able to design and manage enterprise architecture through business and marketplace models for electronic communications and trading, including revenue models and transaction models available through online services
2. Outline the hardware and software technologies used to build an e-business infrastructure within an organisation and with its partners including security issues.
3. Understand the concept of e-strategy at the corporate level, the business unit level and the operational level as well as the concept of value creation.
4. Follow an appropriate strategy process model for e-business and be able to develop an e-business strategy framework with concentration on the impact of the Internet on the macro-environment, the industry structure and the firm boundaries, the markets for e-business and the strategy options for value creation in market spaces and for improving organizational processes with information technology solutions
5. Identify the main elements of supply chain management and their relationship to the value chain and value networks.
6. Identify various procurement methods, their benefits and risks and assess different options for integration of organizations’ information systems with e-procurement suppliers.
7. Identify the characteristics of the new media marketing communications and understand the relation between e-business and e-marketing and how to outline e-marketing plan.

Section: Mathematics Modules

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Develop the methods for solving linear equations and inequalities in one variable.
• Provide students with deep knowledge of linear systems.
• Provide students with deep knowledge of polynomials and polynomial equations.
• Provide students with deep knowledge of rational expressions.
Learning Outcomes:

1. Solve linear equations in one variable and systems of linear equations in twovariables.
2. Solve linear inequalities in one variable.
3. Carry out operations involving polynomials, to factor polynomials and to solvepolynomial equations.
4. Carry out operations involving rational expressions and to solve rational expression equations.
5. Sketch the graph of a linear equation.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• introduce students to the basic principles of management science / operational research and to familiarise them with a number of its concepts and tools
• develop students’ ability to build numerical models and to use these models to help propose policy alternatives
• develop students’ analytical skills
• develop students’ ability to summarise and present data in a professional way
• develop students’ skills in practical decision making
• provide a conceptual understanding of the role of the methods of science in decision making
• develop students’ ability to communicate effectively with non-technical managers.
Learning Outcomes:

1. discuss the importance of quantitative methods in problem solving and decision making
2. structure business problems so that these can be solved by quantitative means
3. select appropriate quantitative methods to address particular types of business problems
4. apply appropriate quantitative methods to solve particular types of business problems
5. develop quantitative models to help propose policy alternatives
6. develop skills in analytical and practical decision making
7. develop a conceptual understanding of the methods of science in decision making
8. summarise and present data in a professional way
9. communicate effectively with non-technical managers.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Make students aware of the concept of measures of central tendency and variation.
• Make students aware of elementary probability theory.
• Cover in detail all aspects of the binomial and the normal random variables and distributions.
• Thoroughly discuss estimation and hypothesis testing.
Learning Outcomes:

1. Explain the meaning of statistical measures and compute measures of central tendency and variation from data.
2. Solve basic theoretical and empirical probability problems
3. Demonstrate the basic concept of discrete and continuous random variables.
4. Compute Probabilities for the binomial distribution and for the normal distribution.
5. Compute confidence intervals.
6. Execute hypothesis testing on the value of the population mean.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Provide students with deep knowledge of the theory of hypothesis testing about population means and proportions.
• Cover in detail all aspects of Analysis of Variance.
• Cover in detail all aspects of the Chi Square Test.
• Cover in detail all aspects of Correlation, Regression and Time Series Analysis.
• Make students aware of the basic Non parametric Tests.
Learning Outcomes:

1. Execute hypothesis testing for the Population Mean μ and the Proportion p.
2. Execute hypothesis testing for the difference between two Population Means (independent samples).
3. Make students aware of Linear Correlation and to perform Multiple Regression.
4. Execute Tests of Independence and Homogeneity.
5. Execute One-Way ANOVA tests.
6. Make students aware of the basic Non Parametric tests.
7. Cover in detail all aspects of Time Series Analysis.
8. Be able to use the SPSS package efficiently.

Section: Social Sciences Modules

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

1. define and/or identify the content of psychology
2. explain the applicability of psychology to one’s own specific major field
3. examine all major theoretical perspectives and translate the empirical methods and data regarding all topics that are involved
4. evaluate the historical and current controversies and research methods in psychology.

Learning Outcomes:

1. recall the relevant historical events leading to the development of psychology
2. examine the major theoretical perspectives
3. inspect critically the different perspectives in psychology
4. elaborate the empirical methods in psychology
5. differentiate the major advantages and disadvantages of the different research methods
6. formulate an overview of the organization of the nervous system
7. illustrate the processes involved in sensation and perception
8. compare and contrast the different levels of consciousness
9. assess the effects of major types of psychoactive drugs
10. utilize classical and operant conditioning theories, and complex learning phenomena
11. distinguish between the main human memory types and processes
12. formulate an overview of language acquisition

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

The main objective of the course is to introduce the students to the scientific field of psychology, through the study and critical review of the basic principles and theories of the various areas of psychology.
Learning Outcomes:

1. Examine the history of psychology
2. Inspect critically the major theoretical perspectives
3. Think critically about the different perspectives in psychology
4. Critically assess how intelligence works from different theoretical perspectives
5. Illustrate how motivation and emotion affect behavior
6. Be able to discuss gender issues and human sexuality
7. Be able to think critically about Human Development and Personality
8. Examine abnormal psychology and health psychology
9. Think critically about psychotherapy
10. Discuss group behavior and dynamics.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

The general aim of the course is to introduce students to the sociological study of society though promotion of knowledge and understanding of central concepts, application of social theory, use of scientific evidence and promotion of critical evaluation of common knowledge and perceptions about various social situations.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Define basic sociological concepts
2. Conceptualize social situations using these concepts
3. Outline the basic principles of the mainstream sociological traditions (functionalism, conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, rational choice theory)
4. Apply theoretical thinking to empirical reality
5. Use empirical evidence in favor or against theoretical explanations
6. Critically evaluate common knowledge and perceptions about current social issues

Section: Hotel/Hospitality/Restaurant Modules

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

Provide the student with an introduction to the world of business and particularly
to business as it applies to the hospitality industry. More specifically, the course
will provide an opportunity for you
• Become acquainted with the social, economic and environmental context within
which the hospitality industry operates
• Understand the structure, nature and operating characteristics of the different
sectors of the hospitality industry: food service, lodging and tourism
• Obtain an appreciation of the various functions of management and their
interrelationships with other key concerns of managers such as marketing, finance
and human resource management
• Be able to identify the role of managers in the hospitality industry and to highlight
their principal responsibilities
• Provide an opportunity for further developing those skills which are important to
learning, e.g. library skills, study skills, and so forth
• Be able to judge whether the hospitality profession suits your abilities, tastes, and career interests

Learning Outcomes:

1. Explain the relation of lodging and food service operations to the travel and
tourism industry.
2. Describe the role of the travel and tourism industry and its economic impact on the
local, national and international levels.
3. Cite opportunities for education, training and career development in the hospitality
industry.
4. Demonstrate knowledge of the history of the lodging and food service industry.
5. Analyze, evaluate and discuss several aspects, development and trends which have
affected lodging and food service operations in recent years and which will continue
to have an impact on the industry in the future.
6. Distinguish and oppose the effect on the industry of franchising, management
contracts, referral organizations, independent and chain ownership and
condominium.
7. Endorse the general classifications of hotels and describe the most distinctive
features of each.
8. Describe the seven common divisions or functional areas of the hotel
organization (Rooms, Food and Beverage, Engineering and Maintenance,
Marketing and Sales, Accounting, Human Resources, and Security) and explain the
responsibilities and activities of each.
9. List departments found in each hotel division.
10. Outline and explain the main classifications of food service.
11. Describe the organization, structure and functional areas in commercial and
institutional food service operation.
12. Discuss aspects of food and beverage controls, which pertain to food and beverage sales, payroll planning and production standards.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Determine the principles of food production, food storage, food preparation and food
use.
• Explain the principles behind meal planning, the role of the nutritional value of foods
and how this affects food service operations.
• Identify sanitation and safety principles as well as discuss relevant hygiene issues
(HACCP).
• Discuss the associations between food and technology and their importance.
• Discuss matters surrounding dietary recommendations and how these relate to menu
planning and food service operations.
• Recognize different types of foods (food commodities), their functions and different uses.

Learning Outcomes:

1. State the basic principles of food science and how this relates to the hospitality industry.
2. Identify the essentials of food hygiene and comprehend the principles of proper food
storage and preservation to avoid any form of food contamination.
3. Comprehend the basics of food production and gain a broad understanding of food
commodities used in quantity food production.
4. Develop new menus using all the food ingredients discussed.
5. Explain the new concept of Gastronomy and its relationship to tourism.
6. Recognize HACCP rules and regulations and implement all these in the Hotel Industry.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

  • Help to prepare students to meet the challenges associated with the
    housekeeping department
  •  Provide an overview of the key issues of housekeeping and maintenance
    management.
  •  To understand the theoretical and practical knowledge that constitutes the
    work of housekeeping
  •  To illustrate the complexities and demands of working in the industry
    through the scope of housekeeping

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe the role of the housekeeping department in hotel operations, and explain the importance of effective communication between housekeeping, the front office and the engineering and maintenance division.
  2.  Identify typical cleaning responsibilities of the housekeeping department, and explain how area inventory lists, frequency schedules, performance standards and productivity standards are used to plan and organize the housekeeping department.
  3.  Apply techniques to develop and improve human resource skills in recruiting, selecting, hiring and orienting. Techniques addressed include identifying sources of labor from non-traditional labor markets, implementing internal and external recruiting methods, minimizing employee turnover, enchasing interviewing skills, and orienting new employees to the housekeeping department.
  4.  Apply techniques to develop and improve human resource skills in areas of training, scheduling, motivating, and disciplining. Techniques addressed include implementing the four-step training method, developing a staffing guide, adopting alternative scheduling methods, motivating the housekeeping staff, and administering a formal disciplinary action program.
  5.  Manage inventories of recycled and non-recycled items. Techniques addressed include establishing par levels for different types of inventories, taking physical inventory, and implementing effective inventory control procedures.
  6.  Control expenses in the housekeeping department by using the operating budget as a control tool, tracking expenses on the basis of a budget cost-peroccupied-room, and implementing efficient purchasing practices.
  7.  Understand the safety and security needs of hospitality operations and how safety and security issues affect H/K personnel.
  8.  Understand the managerial skills necessary to efficiently operate an onpremises laundry operation (OPL). Skills addressed included planning the physical layout of an on-premises laundry operation, developing procedures for laundering different fabrics, organizing the flow of linens through the laundering process, operating typical machines and equipment used in laundry operations, and staffing the OPL.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

  • Provide the ability to analyze and evaluate the guest cycle with the aim of exceeding guest expectations.
  • Develop skills in the management and implementation of guest service.
  • Develop the ability to evaluate the significance of the hotel revenue cycle in order to optimize revenues.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe the critical role of the front office in hotel operations, focusing on communication and customer service both within the front office and with other departments.
  2.  Articulate the responsibilities of a front office manager ( students should be able to understand the responsibilities of the different front office positions.
  3. Discuss daily operations of the front office (students should be able to design departmental organization scheduling).
  4.  Identify the traits and skills needed for by front office employees ( students should acquire the necessary skills needed for front office positions)
  5.  Trace the flow of information( students should be able to control and critical evaluate information from reservations through the night audit)
  6.  Use software’s for front office applications( students should acquire the necessary knowledge in order to be able to use front office software’s that requires a set of communication and computer skills and be familiar with the GDS and CRS
  7. Describe the application of yield management (students should be able to use room revenue maximization techniques).
  8.  Discuss the role of the front office in security and loss prevention( students should acquire knowledge on security systems and policies)
  9. Define hospitality terms and phrases (students should be able to use hospitality front office terminology leading to effective and efficient communication )
  10.  Analyze real-world case studies that relate to the front office (students should be able to critical analyse given front office scenarios and provide solutions leading to practical implementation of their supervisory skills).
  11.  Describe the requirements for promotion into front office supervision and management ( students should acquire knowledge and ability on evaluate skills and competencies needed for career development in front office management)

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Help to prepare students to meet the challenges associated with Hospitality
Information Systems with in the Hospitality Industry.
• Gain an insight into workings of computer systems used in the hospitality industry
• Identify the use and knowledge in the significance of information technology to
an enterprise.
• Introduce and apply training on Point of Sale Systems.

Learning Outcomes:

• Describe the basic functions common to property management systems
• Identify, describe and differentiate between both front house and backhouse
property management system modules.
• Identify stand alone technology systems that may interface with PMS
• Describe the basic functions of a point of sale system(POS)
• Identify and Describe system input, output, external storage and hardware
components.
• Distinguish global distribution systems from internet distribution systems and
distinguish affiliated from non-affiliated reservation systems.
• Identify and describe the functions and features performed by a central
reservation system and the reservation system of a property management system.
• Describe and interpret management reports that pertain to reservation systems.
• Identify features and functions of the Rooms management and Guest accounting applications modules.
• Identify features and functions of an energy management system, point of sale
system, call accounting system, electronic locking systems, guest operated
devices and relevant interface systems
• Identify and describe the features and functions of point of sale technology.
• Identify describe and explain the features and functions of the Food and beverage
applications, and accounting applications
• Identify describe and explain the purpose of information management as it
pertains to the industry, how systems are selected and what are the requirements
of these.
• Identify environmental, electronic, and operational threats to information
systems and how to implement systems security.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Understand the cause and purpose motive specifics of creating an ‘event night’.
• Enhance student personal and/or group duty/work.
• Create and sustain good and trustworthy working relations.
• Become familiar with kitchen glossary and service term.
• Improve student’s skills and knowledge of menu planning and food
accompaniments, its construction, formation and appearance.
• Comprehend basic skills, both interpersonal and technical and apply them to the
food and beverage production and service.
• Become aware of how to prepare a bar for service.
• Combine various methods, e.g. planning, designing, marketing, advertising,
booking, decorating, billing, cooking, waiting, serving, supervising, bar tending,
washing-up and cleaning, thus creating an entire food and beverage ‘Event night’.
• Gain an understanding of the various methods of food and beverage service
delivery.
• Describe and exhibit different kind of costs involved in each event night.
• Monitor customer satisfaction per event night.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Develop basic food production and service skills, both interpersonal and
technical.
2. Be equipped with the skills to perform all service and production operations, to
ensure quality and guest satisfaction.
3. Improve practical experience in the operational administration of a food service facility by providing students the opportunity to exercise their ability and
creativity to manage an actual food and beverage event.
4. Fill in the different roles and job classifications involved with food service
management.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• respond to written, spoken or visual messages in a manner that ensures effective communication
• execute mathematical operations accurately
• apply a systematic approach to solve problems
• use a variety of thinking skills to anticipate and solve problems
• analyze, evaluate, and apply relevant information from a variety of sources
• interact with others in groups or teams in ways that contribute to effective working relationships and the achievement of goals
• synthesize theory with practice in the real world of tourism/hospitality.
• critically analyze cases and real world situations;
• evaluate situations/issues/problems from a variety of stakeholder perspectives;
• evaluate field-specific situations;
• critique ethical considerations.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. 1. Describe a Cost Volume Profit (CVP) relationship for a food and beverage operation.(students should acquire knowledge on the terminology and mathematical formulas utilize them in margin profit)
  2. Explain the various control systems necessary for an efficient food and beverage operation.( students should acquire skills and knowledge in the different control systems available and enhance their critical ability in establishing in different cases the most suitable control system)
  3. Explain the concepts of production standards and portion costs. (students should acquire knowledge in the different formulas available for measuring production standards and portion costs enable them to control profit margin)
  4.  Construct efficient purchasing, receiving, storing, and issuing control systems for food and beverage operations. (students should acquire skills in the control systems from purchasing till issuing products including beverage control)
  5. Generate a budget for a food and beverage operation.( students should acquire knowledge and skills in preparing budget for food and beverage operations)
  6. Explain the factors that impact labor costs.( students should acquire knowledge in the importance of human resource and the how to control the labor cost)
  7. Appraise labor cost control systems in F&B facilities. (students should acquire skills and critical evaluate the labor cost control systems enable them to take the right decisions in different occasions)
  8. Develop and use cost control systems on computerized spreadsheets. (students should acquire skills in the technology available in the area of cost control systems enable them to create folders , spreadsheet and different forms for an F&B cost control system)

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

o Prepare students to meet the challenges associated with the Food and Beverage Industry.
o Provide a familiarity in Food Service Facilities Planning, in the areas of: establishing goals and cost limitations, structural and engineering principles, Formulation of plans and specifications for food needs and operational requirements.

Learning Outcomes:

1. After completion of the course students will be expected to be able to:
2. Distinguish the difference between design and layout
3. Identify the preliminary planning information for foodservice operations
4. Identify the importance of the prospectus and the feasibility study in foodservice layout and design
5. Describe the major principles of functional planning of foodservice facilities
6. General principles of planning the atmosphere in a foodservice establishment
7. Describe the financial aspects of foodservice layout and design
8. Identify the principals and formulate processes and steps that make up a feasibility study
9. Identify the major requirements of equipment used in the foodservice industry
10. Identify the major criteria for equipment selection and design
11. Describe major maintenance requirements for equipment and facilities
12. Identify major layout guides for foodservice facilities
13. Evaluate major foodservice layouts

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Help to prepare students to meet the challenges associated with the Food and Beverage Industry.
• Students will gain a basic understanding of the Food and Beverage industry by analyzing the industry’s :
o growth and development,
o reviewing its organizational structure,
o investigating its relationship with the hotel’s other departments,
o And by focusing on industry opportunities and future trends.
Learning Outcomes:

1. Develop general knowledge on the origins and development of food service in hotels, restaurants, and institutions.
2. Describe the economic impact of the F&B industry.
3. Distinguish between commercial and institutional food service facilities.
4. Identify trends likely to affect food service in the coming years.
5. Identify a variety of managerial, production, and service positions that are typical of the food service industry and describe the roles these positions play in providing food service.
6. Describe managerial responsibilities as they relate to food service functions including menu planning, purchasing, storing, preparation, and recipe development.

7. Define the steps involved in menu planning and menu design.
8. Define the importance and role of Food and Beverage marketing.
9. Identify the major functions and basic principles of Food and Beverage production.
10. Identify and describe the four types of table service and at least two other food service categories.
11. Review the fundamentals of Food and Beverage Management and Control.
12. Describe proper sanitation, hygiene and safety procedures and techniques used on the Food and Beverage industry

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Conduct background research
• Create a design or ‘theme’ for your event
• Locate a suitable site
• Arrange quality food, décor and entertainment
• Plan transportation to and from the event
• Send invitations to guests
• Arrange any necessary guest accommodation
• Coordinate the activities of event personnel
• Supervise at the site on the day
• Conduct evaluations of the event

Learning Outcomes:

1. Conduct a research activity in order to better understand the client and the event;
2. Create a design theme that will complement the event under consideration;
3. Investigate options available for a either a pre-determined site or one that has yet to be decided;
4. Organize and arrange the appropriate catering, décor and entertainment;
5. Plan the necessary transport arrangements to and from the event;
6. Organize and send invitations to guests;
7. Arrange any necessary guest accommodation;
8. Coordinate the activities of the human resources involved in the event;
9. Effectively supervise the event on the day;
10. Conduct an evaluation of the event in order to highlight weaknesses for future improvement.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• To provide an understanding of the rights, obligations and liabilities concerning laws and regulations which govern the hospitality and travel industry.
• Students will acquire the knowledge needed to facilitate compliance with regards to regulations concerning hotels, restaurants and travel operations.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Identify the legislation relevant to the statutory compliance of organizations;
2. Undertake the proper licensing procedures for tourism and hospitality operations;
3. Develop and honour business contracts;
4. Identify and effectively handle liability and rights issues;
5. Comply with employment legislation;
6. Comply with customer liability legislation;
7. Comply with health and safety legislation;

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

· Think critically in order to analyze a problem and develop a solution;
· Use academic methods (e.g. using referenced arguments);
· Identify and operate adequate software;
· Identify and adjust to future trends;
· Work in a multicultural environment;
· Work in an interdisciplinary context;
· Develop Awareness of and respect for points of view deriving from different social and cultural backgrounds;

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the international dimensions of the industry;
  2. Explain the significance of the industry within the global environment;
  3. Analyse, evaluate and discuss the issues that need to be addressed when doing business beyond national boarders;
  4. Identify future issues surrounding the industry.
  5. Describe and demonstrate knowledge of the various aspects of managing in a global context
  6. Describe and analyse the international dimensions of marketing, human resource management, financial management, strategy, diversity and operations management.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Develop academic method: thinking, research, referencing and integrative skills with initiative and originality.
• Introduce students to the complexity of intercultural communication into Hospitality and Tourism Industry
• know the main characteristics of each country business etiquette
• Help students develop a curiosity and love for the field
• Aid students to understand the concepts of diversity in the industry
• Develop in students:
• Intercultural communication skills
• Abilities to interpret and adjust in any working environment

Learning Outcomes:

1. Identify intercultural communication as a distinguishable pattern of communication for the purposes of effective cross-cultural interaction.
2. Evaluate the impact of the complexity of culture and personal perception on communication.

3. Participate in critical self-analysis to diminish the influence of ethnocentrism as it produces negative thoughts and actions towards members of a different culture(s).
4. Recognize the societal impact of prejudice and stereotyping.
5. Demonstrate a healthy perspective of their culture and its positive contribution to the cross-cultural communication setting.
6. Distinguish diverse message systems and how they impact communication such as verbal and nonverbal symbol systems.
7. Operate effectively within the global workforce.
8. Identify potential problems inherent to intercultural communication and employ effective conflict resolution practices.
9. Analyze the relevance for adopting culture-general as well as culture-specific methodologies of cross-cultural communication.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Develop academic method: thinking, research, referencing, collating and
integrative skills with initiative and originality.
• Develop in students the basic understanding and introductory skills to work
with geography
• Introduce students to the nature of geography
• Help students develop a curiosity and love for the field
• Encourage students by giving content and skill to explain:
• The distribution and spatially different activities of human across the earth
• Variations of population growth and migration of humans through typical and exceptional trends
• Cultural differences and their spatial variations
• Development of subsistence and economic activity patterns and their relation to
the environment
• The development of resource use and the implication of resource depletion,
particularly of fossil fuels’ impact on civilization
• Aid students to understand the unique spatial basis of geography
• Space: place, position and links
• Develop in students:
• Map skills
• Abilities to visually represent and interpret facts of geography

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Work with academic method to think, research, reference, collate and integrate facts and concepts with initiative and originality.
  2. Explain the distribution of human activity
  3. Work with data and information within the methods of cultural geography
    • Interpret maps and data
    • Visually represent data in tabulated form or maps as they relate to the field
  4. Analyze the causes for spatial variation in population statistics and migration patterns
  5. Describe and account for cultural difference and distribution
  6. Understand the nature and role of intercultural communication for a multicultural Europe
  7. Understand the relation of subsistence and economic activity within peoples within their environment
  8. Appreciate the finiteness of energy supplies and the impact of scarcity on civilization and consider alternatives for fuel and contingencies for other lifestyles in a post-energy era
  9. Develop skills to:
    • • Understand and explain space with its place, position and links
    • • Work with maps and visual presentation of geographic data and trends
    • Interpret geographic data

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Understand the Five Stages of M.I.C.E Management: Research, Design, Planning, Coordination, and Evaluation.
• Learn the concepts of communication and synergy, and how they apply to M.I.C.E Design.
• Learn how to conduct an M.I.C.E site inspection.
• Understand budgeting, pricing, and accounting as they relate to M.I.C.E Design.
• Understand the various types of special M.I.C.E, and the requirements for each.
• Submit a complete Conference Design Project, in which the student applies his or her knowledge of M.I.C.E Management and Design to a professional-level M.I.C.E    Design Plan.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Explain the role of convention centers in the meetings and convention industry
2. Describe the economic impact of the meetings and conference industry
3. Identify the factors that influence the growth of the meetings and conference industry
4. Identify types of associations and the meetings they hold
5. Distinguish between three types of association membership and summarize the typical communication channels within an association

6. Identify the industry’s miscellaneous markets and describe concerns involved in servicing those markets.
7. Describe the meeting planner’s overall role within the industry
8. Define the marketing concept as it applies to the meetings and conferences industry
9. Recognize the importance and responsibilities of the sales/marketing department
10. Explain the importance of positive communication with the customers
11. Describe elements associated with providing guestrooms, function rooms and other related services for meetings
12. Identify methods of simplifying F&B services for the meetings and convention industry
13. Recognize the importance of technology to the meetings and convention industry

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Introduce students to the planning, organizing and operational aspects of conventional and non-conventional events operations.
• Provide students with knowledge, skills, creativity and specific techniques in Food Services in Special Events.
• Help students manage and administer a range of special events, banquets and conventions, ensuring customer satisfaction, food quality and safety.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Develop general knowledge on the origins and development of banqueting, events and foodservice.
2. Identify the nature and type of special events and conventions and the scope of their operation.
3. Describe basic principles of food and beverage planning to satisfy needs of the audience, participants, staff and other stakeholders.
4. Identify systems and procedures for foodservices management, procurement and control in special events and conventions.
5. Recognize internal regulations and external legislation governing provision of foodservices for special events and conventions.
6. Develop needs assessment strategy to trace and manage key stages in special events and conventions coordination.
7. Apply knowledge/concepts of events and banqueting management to real world situations in individual and team-based work.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Analyze human needs and expectations in the achievement of satisfaction.
• Deal with complaints, remedies and prevention.
• Articulate the characteristics of service and a gap analysis between expectations and satisfaction.
• Evaluate a quality analysis, its implementation and consequences.
• Merge service and quality in order to achieve an effective application of service quality.
• Develop and control effective employee performance towards quality service.
• Analyze of ISO/BS standards of quality.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Critically evaluate the modern concepts and theories of quality management. (students should acquire Knowledge of quality theories available, describe the ‘system view’ that underlines modern quality management thinking)
2. Identify the factors that contribute to the continuous quality improvement process. (students should acquire knowledge to compare and contrast Deming’s, Juran’s, and Crosby’s perception of quality of management and identify why commitment is an important variable in quality improvement initiatives)
3. Explore the concepts of Quality management and its application to the Hospitality and Tourism sector. (students should acquire knowledge and abilities in the ways in which services are unique in comparison with manufacture industry, and how the differences affect the management of service quality).
4.Appraise the various evaluation frameworks that exist. (students should acquire knowledge and be able identify the advantages of the ‘servqual’ instrument)
5. Demonstrate the relationships between quality management and human resource management. (students should acquire abilities in recognizing the importance of the human factor in implementing quality systems)
6. Recognize the role and significance of TQM with a strategic management context. (students should acquire knowledge and skills in planning of quality management process)

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Think critically in order to analyze a problem and develop a solution;
• Use academic methods (e.g. using referenced arguments);
• Identify and adjust to future trends;
• Identify and use adequate tools (i.e. market research, statistical analysis);
• Develop a theoretical and applied perspective;
• Identify the impacts of related disciplines on the field;
• Learn-to-learn, i.e. how, when, where – new personal development is needed (e.g. rhetoric, presentation, working in teams, personal management, keeping up to date);
• Understand details of business functions, as related to the field;
• Consider the importance of intellectual, personal and professional development and enrichment

Learning Outcomes:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of the industry;
2. Synthesize the various aspects and dimensions of the skills developed throughout the programme;
3. Analyse, evaluate and discuss the contradictory evidence that separates theory from practice;
4. Reconcile the issues highlighted in the previous outcome;
5. Reflect, critique and evaluate both the self and the exogenous outcomes of the programme;

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• collection and analysis of data for the purpose of resolving issues directly related to career planning;
• development of intrapersonal and interpersonal skills;
• confidence when interacting with others in a number of organizational settings;
• communication, both orally and in writing;
• problem – solving;
• effective use resources in order to ‘learn how to learn.’

Learning Outcomes:

1. articulate the challenges of developing a career;
2. prepare a self-assessment in order to develop a career plan;
3. integrate the self-assessment and analyze its implications;
4. conduct a job search;
5. develop career development strategies;
6. integrate work and personal life;
7. evaluate workplace flexibility arrangements;

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Introduce students to the various fields of transportation relevant for the tourism industry:
• Land-based transportation (public transport, railroads, private car, etc.)
• Water based transportation (cruise and ferry industry, freight-ship-tourism, etc.)
• Airline-industry (scheduled flight, charter flight, low-cost-carrier, etc.)
• Familiarize students with the important role of transportation for destinations accessibility, internally as well as externally.
• Stress the changing framework-conditions for transportation
• Peak-oil
• Climate change
• Emissions trading
• Etc.
• Develop in students:
• awareness towards the need of the integrating of transportation in tourism development
• the ability to analyze and forecast possible transportation needs for a certain destination

Learning Outcomes:

1. provide an overview on all tourism relevant transportation sectors
2. manage transportation needs for certain destination
3. evaluate the role of transportation as tourism attraction
4. critically analyze the limits of further infrastructure development
5. articulate the consequences of steadily increasing transportation infrastructure

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• Enable students to describe and understand the specific features of environmental management in the hospitality and tourism industry;
• To evaluate how environmental management systems relate to management as a whole;
• To critically assess environmental impact issues related to hospitality and tourism activities.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Identify a number of global environmental problems and explain the principles, theories and application of environmental management in the hospitality & tourism industry.
2. Analyze and evaluate the reasons why environmental management is increasingly important in the hospitality & tourism industry.
3. Recognize and analyze the operational constraints and legal obligations surrounding environmental performance in the hospitality & tourism industry.
4. Interpret environmental theory and critically apply it to real life cases.
5. Communicate and react proactively to the stakeholders in the hospitality & tourism industry in the areas of environmental management.
6. Present ideas to different audiences using appropriate media and use IT as a communication and learning tool.

Section: Business Support Modules

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

1. Explain the main principles of accounting, including the accounting equation and the double entry system.
2. Expose students to financial statements (i.e. Income Statement, Balance Sheet).
3. Expose students to post Trial Balance adjustments (depreciation of non-current assets, accruals, prepayments, and allowance for doubtful debts).
4. Enable students to prepare Bank Reconciliation Statements.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Explain what accounting is about.
2. Understand and list the main users of accounting information.
3. Present and explain the accounting equation, and how accounting transactions affect the items in the accounting equation.
4. Open ‘T’ accounts, understand how the double entryis used, and record transactions into individual accounts.
5. Prepare Trial Balance, Income Statement, and Balance Sheet. Explain how adjustments (e.g. prepayments, accruals, etc.) affect the financial statements.
6. Describe the process of recording transactions in a book of original entry.
7. Explain and operate the imprest system for petty cash.
8. Account for bad debts and allowance for doubtful debts.
9. Account for depreciation of non-current assets.
10. Understand and prepare bank reconciliation statement.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

  1. Provide an in-depth understanding of accounting for inventory, cash, receivables, fixedassets and current liabilities for a sole proprietorship
  2. Expose students to partnerships and accounting for partnerships.
  3. Expose students to corporations and accounting for corporations.
  4. Introduce the Statement of Cash Flows.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Understand and deal with the accounting issue that arises when identical units ofmerchandise are acquired at different unit costs during the period (students should be able todescribe, compare and contrast the three inventory cost flow assumptions and how they impact theincome statement and balance sheet; determine the cost of inventory under the perpetual andperiodic systems, using FIFO, LIFO and average cost methods; describe and illustrate the reportingof merchandise inventory in the financial statements).
  2. Describe and illustrate the application of internal controls to cash (students should be able to describe the nature of a bank statement and its use in controlling cash; describe and illustrate the use of a bank reconciliation in controlling cash; describe and illustrate the reporting of cash and cash equivalents in the financial statements).
  3. Understand the classification of receivables and the accounting of uncollectible receivables (students should be able to describe and compare the direct write off method and the allowance method for accounting for uncollectible receivables; describe the methods used to estimate uncollectibles under the allowance method; describe the nature, characteristics, and accounting for notes receivable; describe the reporting of receivables on the balance sheet).
  4. Understand the accounting for fixed and intangible assets (students should be able to define, classify, and account for the cost of fixed assets; compute depreciation of fixed assets using straight line, double-declining and units of production method; account for the disposal or trade-in of fixed assets; describe the accounting for intangible assets; describe the reporting of fixed and intangibles on the balance sheet and depreciation expense on the income statement).
  5. Understand the accounting for current liabilities and payroll (students should be able to describe and illustrate current liabilities related to accounts payable, current portion of long-term debt, and notes payable; determine employer liabilities of payroll, including liabilities arising from employee earnings and deductions from earnings; describe the accounting treatment for contingent liabilities).
  6. Understand the accounting for partnerships (students should be able to describe the basic characteristics of partnerships; describe and illustrate the accounting for forming a partnership, for dividing the net income and the net loss of a partnership, for partner admission and withdrawal, and for liquating a partnership; prepare the statement of partnership equity).
  7. Understand the accounting for corporations (students should be able to describe the nature of the corporate form of organization; describe and illustrate the characteristics of stock, classes of stock, and entries for issuing stock; account for cash and stock dividends and for treasury stock transactions; describe and illustrate the reporting of stockholders equity).
  8. Prepare a Statement of Cash Flows (students should be able to summarize the types of cash flow activities reported in the statement of cash flows and prepare a statement of cash flows using the indirect and direct method).

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• make students aware of the various business disciplines
• how to integrate their knowledge
• apply this knowledge to the planning and managing of strategic business activities.
• explore the management and strategy concepts and analytical techniques
• build on and expose students to the general management ‘big picture’, thereby providing a cross-functional and strategic perspective.
• stress the interrelationships between different aspects of the organisation and the integrated nature of strategy.
• integrate their knowledge of the various business disciplines and to apply this knowledge to the planning and managing of strategic business activities.
Learning Outcomes:

• Analyse the external environment and its impact on the organisation
• Assess the internal environment and strategic change issues facing an organization
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the business environment and strategic considerations it raises
• Apply theory, models, frameworks and decision-making tools to identify key issues and make recommendations based on your findings.
• Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of selecting and adopting various strategic options which characterize the competitive business environment.
• The ability to analyse case studies on aspects of strategic management

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

• introduce students to the basic concepts and functions of management
• introduce students to a range of important management processes, which can be used to support the main management functions
• help students understand the nature of the external business environment and its effect on the organisation
• help students understand the systemic nature of organisations
• help students appreciate the importance of human resources in management
• help students appreciate the importance of team work in management and become effective team players
• familiarise students with decision making tools and develop their analytical skills
• develop students’ critical thinking and their ability to develop an argument and to defend a position
• encourage students to engage in debates on management issues, including controversial management topics.
Learning Outcomes:

1. discuss the importance of management both as an occupation and as a universal human activity
2. view organisations as complex human activity systems
3. discuss and apply the basic management functions of planning, organising, leading and controlling
4. discuss and apply the main management processes
5. demonstrate how good management can help organisations become effective and efficient
6. critically discuss the importance of the external business environment and its effect on the organisation
7. critically discuss the importance of human resources in management
8. critically discuss the importance of team work in management
9. carry out independent research using a variety of resources
10. participate in debates on controversial management issues.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:

· Collection and analysis of data for the purpose of resolving issues directly relatedto human resource management;
· Development of intrapersonal and interpersonal skills;
· Confidence when interacting with others in a number of organizational settings;
· Communication, both orally and in writing;
· Problem – solving;
· Effective use of resources in order to ‘learn how to learn.’
Learning Outcomes:

1. Develop strategic recruitment/selection policies and practices.
2. Perform an effective job analysis.
3. Prepare a job description.
4. Prepare a job specification.
5. Develop effective job design processes and procedures.
6. Prepare and perform effective selection interviews.
7. Perform a training needs analysis.
8. Develop and implement effective training programmes.
9. Evaluate jobs in order to determine salary/wage scales.
10. Develop and implement effective disciplinary processes and procedures.
11. Utilize employee associations for better business results.
12. Manage employer/employer negotiations so as to avoid conflict situations in the workplace.
13. Analyze health and safety issues in the workplace for better employee performance.
14. Evaluate the legal environment and its impact on the workplace.

Course Credits: 3

Course Description:

Objectives of the Course:
To provide the students with a comprehensive understanding of the Marketing Concept, Philosophy, Practice and Processes. Major emphasis is placed on the elements of the Marketing mix.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. To explain the importance of understanding customers and the marketplace and identify the core marketplace concepts. (Students are expected to appreciate the role of marketing in understanding customers’ needs and wants and providing value and customer satisfaction).
  2. To explain marketing’s role in strategic planning and how marketing works to create and deliver customer value. (Students are required to identify and analyze the elements of the strategic planning process).
  3. To analyze the environmental forces that affect a company’s ability to serve its customers and how companies can react to the marketing environment. (Students are expected to identify and describe the micro and macro environmental factors and forces that influence the company’s activities).
  4. To describe how consumers’ personal, cultural, social and psychological characteristic can influence consumer buying behavior. (Students are expected to know the factors affecting consumer behavior and to identify the role/s a consumer assumes in the decision-making process).
  5. To analyze how the Marketing Information System and Marketing Research support marketing decision making. (Students are expected to identify and assess the factors and decisions that affect the design, development and use of the Marketing Information System and the Marketing Research Process).
  6. To analyze the four elements of the Marketing Mix Strategy (Students are required to identify, explain and analyze the four elements of the marketing mix strategy, product, price place and promotion as well as to identify the most important decisions that need to be taken in designing, developing and implementing these tools).
Course Information
  • Delivery Mode:Online/Blended
  • Programme TypeBachelor’s Degree

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